Monthly Archives: February 2011

What is the problem?

questionmark-paperclips

The next time you have to solve a problem, start by asking how to define it. You will save yourself lots of time and irritation if you slow down long enough to reach a thoughtful answer. As the great American engineer and inventor Charles Kettering put it: “A problem well stated is a problem half-solved.”

Every day you engage in cross-cultural communication. With your co-workers, friends, children, and spouse. An abundance of research shows that, often without knowing it, you cross from one culture to another at work and in social settings. At work, there is the culture of the finance department, where people speak the language of return-on-investment and spend lots of time assembling profit-and-loss projections. In the culture of sales, by contrast, your co-workers focus on relationships and devote a good part of their schedules to visiting customers in the field. Jay Lorsch, a management expert who spent years studying collaboration in the workplace, observed that “recurring conflict is inevitable” among people from different functions. The reason is that they have different priorities, professional values, and mind-sets. The strategic planner is thinking about scenarios that may develop two years from now. The call center supervisor is worried about the volume her staff hasContinue Reading >

Only a small, select group of people can or wants to be an elite athlete like Roger Federer.  But everybody can learn from how he manages his own professional and personal development: through a series of tweaks rather than dramatic, game-changing overhauls. Federer has a coach, the former pro-tour player Paul Annacone, who topped out at No. 12 in the world in the 1980s.  Annacone describes his role in modest terms: “There’s no magic pill, no secret whispering with voodoo dolls going on.”  He knows the importance of keeping expectations in check.  “People tend to get sensationalistic about what’s going on,” he says, “ and I think it’s my job to kind of help keep that perspective.” When it comes to self-improvement, Federer has some obvious advantages, not the least of which are his enormous talent and an awesome track record of success.  Yet even for someone at the topContinue Reading >

Only a small, select group of people can or wants to be an elite athlete like Roger Federer.  But everybody can learn from how he manages his own professional and personal development: through a series of tweaks rather than dramatic, game-changing overhauls. Federer has a coach, the former pro-tour player Paul Annacone, who topped out at No. 12 in the world in the 1980s.  Annacone describes his role in modest terms: “There’s no magic pill, no secret whispering with voodoo dolls going on.”  He knows the importance of keeping expectations in check.  “People tend to get sensationalistic about what’s going on,” he says, “ and I think it’s my job to kind of help keep that perspective.” When it comes to self-improvement, Federer has some obvious advantages, not the least of which are his enormous talent and an awesome track record of success.  Yet even for someone at the topContinue Reading >

Only a small, select group of people can or wants to be an elite athlete like Roger Federer.  But everybody can learn from how he manages his own professional and personal development: through a series of tweaks rather than dramatic, game-changing overhauls. Federer has a coach, the former pro-tour player Paul Annacone, who topped out at No. 12 in the world in the 1980s.  Annacone describes his role in modest terms: “There’s no magic pill, no secret whispering with voodoo dolls going on.”  He knows the importance of keeping expectations in check.  “People tend to get sensationalistic about what’s going on,” he says, “ and I think it’s my job to kind of help keep that perspective.” When it comes to self-improvement, Federer has some obvious advantages, not the least of which are his enormous talent and an awesome track record of success.  Yet even for someone at the topContinue Reading >

© 2017, MOUSSA CONSULTING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED TERMS OF USE / PRIVACY POLICY